5 Artists Redefining Classic Techniques and Materials

Mary-Lynn Massoud and Rasha Nawam. Photography courtesy of the designers.

The studio and kiln. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

An assortment of glazed ceramic bowls. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

A one-of-a-kind wall relief piece spans 30 feet. Photography courtesy of the designers.

Mary-Lynn Massoud with a totem formed of kiln rejects. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Bowls by Massoud and Nawam. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Several works on a shelf in their studio. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Ceramic dishes. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

A totem of kiln rejects. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Giulia Birindelli. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Birindelli's home studio in Milan. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Studio office. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Some of Birindelli's works "at rest." Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

A detail of Archipelago, 2014. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Detail of Boundaries, 2014. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

A text carved into canvas. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

A close-up of Birindelli's embroidery work. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

 Birinidelli embroidering a piece of fabric. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

 A close-up of Birindelli's handiwork. Photography by Filippo Bamberghi/Photofoyer.

Matteo Brioni with a sample of Terrawabi—natural clays with no additional pigments. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

The exterior of Brioni’s studio. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Various decorative terra cruda surfaces. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Brioni "harvesting" clay. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Brioni’s working materials include MadreTinta pigments, natural earth colors, mineral oxides, and lacquers. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

An example of Terraevoca. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

A textured piece by Brioni. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

textured piece by Brioni. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

textured piece by Brioni. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Brian's studio space. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Francesco Faccin tests out a plaster bust on his pedestal. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

The setup for Bronzification, an exhibition at the foundry's gipsoteca (plaster-cast gallery). Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Faccin's Serial Planks side table. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Courtesy of the lost-wax casting process, each 59-by-2 3⁄4-inch bronze plank is slightly different. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

A Serial Planks pedestal in the Fonderia Artistica Battaglia’s wax workshop. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

A chair by Faccin. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

A sample of Faccin's work. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Faccin's work. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

An easel. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Faccin with his materials. Photography by Lea Anouchinsky/Living Inside.

Lauren Williams with one of her fiber works. Photography by Elizabeth Lavin.

Williams cutting the yarn to create the “canvas.” Photography by Jonathan McInnis.

Williams dyeing strands of yarn. Photography by Aubree Edwards.

A finished piece. Photography by James Williams.

Williams in her studio. Photography by Aubree Edwards.

Another finished piece. Photography courtesy of Lauren Williams.

Williams with one of her works. Photography by Lacey Land.

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