12 Immersive Installations at London Design Festival 2016

The mesmerizing reflections of Benjamin Hubert's Foil installation for Braun at the V&A. The 66-foot-long structure swaths the room in dappled light while a continuous soundtrack of classical music is played. Photography by Ed Reeve.

The Smile by Alison Brooks and the American Hardwood Export Council in cross-laminated American tulipwood in the Chelsea College of Arts' courtyard. The largest structure made of CLT (cross-laminated timber) in the world, the enormous 12-panel installation is held together with 7,000 foot-long screws. Image courtesy of London Design Festival.

MINI and Asif Khan present the MINI LIVING Forests installation in Shoreditch. Featuring three box-like structures, including one elevated on stilts that visitors must climb under to gain access, the publicly placed spaces offer visitors brief respite from the hustle and bustle of urban living. Image courtesy of London Design Festival.

Lee Broom’s East London studio became a mirrored cave for his Op-Artinspired lighting that launched earlier this year at Milan Design Week. The monochrome showroom gave visitors an immersive Willy-Wonka-meets-Art-Deco experience down to the striped macarons. Photography by Luke Hayes.

The French champagne brand Perrier-Jouet turned a two-story gallery space in Soho into L’Eden, a joint collaboration between the designer Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance and the British design duo Bompass & Parr. It includes the first ever bio-responsive garden, brimming with plants that respond to visitors’ movements.

The French champagne brand Perrier-Jouet turned a two-story gallery space in Soho into L’Eden, a joint collaboration between the designer Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance and the British design duo Bompass & Parr. It includes the first ever bio-responsive garden, brimming with plants that respond to visitors’ movements.

The Sign Machine is the brainchild of Morag Myerscough & Luke Morgan, who updated the elegant Bulgari hotel lobby with a highly visible disruption calling out in neon to passersby. The pair are also responsible for the Designer Maker User permanent exhibition that will be unveiled at the new home of the Design Museum in November. Photography by Mark Cocksedge.

Bocci’s immersive light installation 44 is the second site-specific commission for the Lightwell in the Barbican foyer. Designed by Omer Arbel, the light installation comprises over 300 free-poured aluminum forms suspended from the ceiling by a matrix of thin cables. Photography by Tobias Faisst.

Turner Prize winning creative ensemble Assemble worked with the acclaimed Granby Workshop to make an original series of ceramics for Ready Made Go 2 at the Ace Hotel. In an adaptation of traditional smoke firing techniques, the tiles are all unique and were used to clad the 7th floor bar at Ace Hotel Shoreditch. Photography by Jorn Tomter.

Mathieu Lehanneur’s Liquid Marble series was installed in the Music Room at the V&A Museum for the duration of the London Design Festival. Liquid Marble is a vision of the sea, mimicking the look and feel of rippling water, made of a single piece of hand-polished black marble. Photography by Ed Reeve.

Doshi Levien created an installation at the Kvadrat showroom to showcase the four new curtain textiles for Kvadrat inspired by different architectural textures and tapestries by the renowned Le Corbusier. Photography by Annabel Elston.

The multi-sensory installation by Tabanlioglu Architects brought Sabahattin Ali’s classic 1943 novel Madonna in a Fur Coat to life through Beloved. Visitors must get up close to the 43-foot mirrored black box structure to see and hear the installation. Photography by Mark Cocksedge.

Within the Victoria & Albert Museum, a towering installation created by design studio Glithero in collaboration with luxury watchmaker Panerai fills the 58-foot high stairwell with silicone cords, each of which are connected to a central rotating device that is constantly moving. The Green Room results in a wave of moving color that can be experienced from multiple levels, aiming to change the perception of what a clock can be.

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