4Space Interior Design Fires Up a Barbeque Restaurant in Dubai

PROJECT NAME AtmosFire
LOCATION Dubai
FIRM 4Space
SQ. FT. 6,000 SQF

No matter what kind of sauce you prefer, or whether you’d rather throw a slab of meat or an array of fresh vegetables on the grill, the most important part of any barbeque is the fire. The Dubai-based firm 4Space clearly had this in mind when they conceived the interiors for AtmosFire, a 6,000-square-foot restaurant a stone's throw from the Persian Gulf’s beaches.

Parla’s chairs form a ring around the brazier’s solid surface counter; the platform is an inverted colorway of the black terrazzo of the main floor. Photography by Anas Rifai.

“The main inspiration is the pit, where families and friends traditionally gather around the fire and grill,” says design director and managing partner Firas Alsahin. But this is hardly a hole in the ground: instead, they hung a freestanding brazier on a double-height ceiling, “custom made by casting a circular type of bricks.” Spotlights hang on to a copper-finished ring above the circular counter, itself rung around with rotating, custom chairs to offer views of what’s cooking on six different grills. And the walls are covered with LED grill marks, another tasty idea to whet the appetite.

LED strips with silicone diffusers sizzle like grill marks on the wall, branded by a custom neon sign. Photography by Anas Rifai.
The bar and juice counter is served by custom shelves of wood and steel. Photography by Anas Rifai.
Bulb Lighting pendants hand above custom tables and banquettes by Cube Wooden. Photography by Anas Rifai.
Cube Wooden provided sinks, fittings, mirrors, and vanities for the bathrooms. Photography by Anas Rifai.
A column with a faux-concrete paint treatment announces the mezzanine stairwell, which is made of LG acrylic with concealed LEDs. Photography by Anas Rifai.
Custom banquettes are covered in Parla leather. Photography by Anas Rifai.
The team added plasters to the bricks to achieve an aged effect, reflected in mirrored copper sheets across parts of the ceiling. Photography by Anas Rifai.

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