Innovation
Tech | Science
Bacteria That Builds Bricks Is Here

A team of researchers is using photosynthetic microbes to create a living concrete, which can reproduce while absorbing carbon dioxide. Did we mention it changes color, too? The new construction material morphs from shades of green into more muted tones as it dries. 

Tech | Science

Eyes In The Back Of Your Head

Want to change the channel with a simple glance toward the corner of the TV screen? The startup NextMind is pioneering a noninvasive neural interface, which sits at the back of the skull, that claims to help you do just that and more. 

Tech | Artificial Intelligence
Are You Real? The Advent of AI Beings
Tech | Engineering
It's Electric: Meet the World's Fastest Airplane
Tech | Engineering
May The Force Be With You

Calculating Carbon Emissions is Key to Improving Health

In medicine, diagnostic tools are essential, arguably as important as advancements in treatments. Take the thermometer. In the early 1700s, physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit discovered that adding a bulb of mercury to a narrow glass tube created a more precise and efficient measure of temperature, forever changing the course of medicine. While the mercury thermometer was hardly the first means to document temperature shifts—Galileo created a device to do this in the late 1500s—its minimalist design and precise readings made for a widely accessible innovation. When it comes to the human body, an infection or abnormality only can be cured, or treated, when its presence is known, which means advancements in diagnostic devices are constantly in demand. The same goes for our planet, and instruments that help measure, maintain, and restore its balance are as vital as ever.

Tech | Science
Could Your DNA Help You Date?
Tech | Sustainability
Meet The Search Engine Tackling Climate Change
Advertisement
Tech | Science
Chip Ahoy!
Chipping parties could bring implants to a limb near you and some companies (and people) are all about it. Welcome to our future.
Tech | Science

Holograms Come of Age

Researchers from the University of Sussex have found a way to create holograms that you can not only see but also hear and even feel using ultrasound waves.

Advertisement
Tech | Products
A House Blanket Could be the Solution to Wildfires
Tech | Robotics
Walk This Way
Tech | Engineering
It's a bird, it's a plane... no it's a Volocopter
Tech | Science

The Future of Food

Take a look at these companies shaping the way we eat with sustainable solutions and innovative technologies. 

Tech | Science
Can Flame-Retardant Gel Protect Forests From Wildfires?
Tech | Engineering
A new Biotechnology Solution Could be the end of Plastic
Advertisement
Tech | Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Intelligence-Driven Apps Deliver Relationship Advice

Want to find out if a text conversation is flirty or friendly? A new batch of apps, which use artificial intelligence to evaluate communication patterns, may have the answer. 

Tech | Science

Inside the Controversial Plan to Cool the Planet

Could spraying chemicals into the sky reverse some impacts of global warming? Scientists are considering the possible benefits and risks of solar geoengineering, a controversial concept that could possibly cut global temperature increases in half.  

Tech | Robotics
Watch MIT's Unsettling Brain-Burrowing Robot Designed to Help Stroke Victims in Action
Tech | Augmented Reality
Augmented Audio Experiences are the Future of Headphones
Tech | Engineering
"Ice" to Meet You: The Mini-Submarines that Could Re-Freeze the Arctic
Tech | Food

The Future Points to BYOB Vending Machines

Grab your reusable bottle since Dasani is rolling out 100 BYOB vending machines – essentially, refillable water stations – as a test approach to curb plastic waste. The company also will start selling water in aluminum cans, which are made from more recycled material than plastic bottles, in the northeast this fall.

Tech | Science
Facebook Wants to Read your Mind
Tech | Transportation
The Electric Scooter Wars Are Fully Charged
Tech | Science
CRISPR Therapy Tackles Some of Humanity's Worse Genetic Ailments
Tech | Sustainability
Rural America Is Experiencing A Solar Revolution

Despite all the pro-coal bluster from the Trump administration, solar has been steadily gaining popularity in rural areas across the U.S. This push for sustainable energy is driven primarily by local energy co-ops that can take advantage of the reduced price of solar power, as well as marketing and campaigning by the National Rural Electricity Cooperative Association. Today, the NRECA has reduced its reliance on coal to just 40% in 2017, down from 54% in 2014. 

Tech | Augmented Reality

Burger King Will Give You A Free Whopper In Exchange For Virtual Arson

Who says crime doesn't pay deliciously? In Brazil, Burger King will give you a coupon for a free whopper if you use their app to burn rival fast-food chains' advertisements in augmented reality. The campaign is tied to the launch of Burger King's mobile payment technology.  

Tech | Transportation
Oslo Commits To Green Living With Wireless Taxi Charging
Tech | Software
New Algorithm Turns Doodles Into Hyper-Real Imagery In Seconds
Tech | 3-D Printing
New 3-D Printer Uses Light to Create Bespoke Objects In Just 2 Minutes
Tech | Sustainability

New Solar Blind Harvests More Power Than Window Coatings

Soligami may sound like a delicious cured meat, but it's actually the next development in transforming windows into solar panels. While there are currently coatings that can generate solar energy from windows, they darken rooms and aren't particularly efficient. Soligami, developed by Australia-based design firm Prevalent, would hang like a drape and use unique origami-inspired folds to bounce light around across multiple panels, generating large amounts of energy.

Tech | Engineering
Those Voices in Your Head Are Real and They're Coming from a Laser
Tech | Transportation
No Longer Blinded By The Headlights
Tech | Healthcare
AI Opens New Doors to Understanding Mental Health
Tech | Food
The Robotic Future of Farming

Thanks to advances in zoological sciences, we know that humans are not the only species that have the capacity for self-awareness, language, or even farming. But one cognitive ability we do have over other animals is thinking into the far future, which is a skill we've been under-employing as we face the looming threat of cataclysmic climate change and a swelling global population. But changes in the way we do agriculture, which currently produces 33% of green house gas emissions, could have long term positive effects on our planet. And a lot of these changes will be the result of robots taking on most of the tasks on large and small farms.

Tech | Robotics

The Future of Coral Reefs May Depend on Robot Fertilizers

"Living Coral" may be Pantone's 2019 color of the year, but the situation of real coral is quite dire. Warming global ocean temperatures threaten to totally destroy coral reefs and destabilize the marine ecosystems that they support. It's a manmade problem, and one scientist is proposing a manmade solution: LarvalBot, an underwater robot equipped to dispense heat resistant coral larvae over failing reefs.  

Tech | Sustainability
English Town Trades in Coal Economy for Solar-Powered Housing
Tech | Products
Technology Veers Into the Absurd at CES 2019
Tech | Robotics
More Unsettling Tech Developments Arriving in 2019
Tech | Robotics

Let "Serve" Serve you

Ever feel guilty about ordering delivery in the rain? No longer - Postmates is introducing “Serve” in Los Angeles; a little friendly-looking robot that’s waiting to replace your delivery guy. Serve can carry up to 50 pounds, “walk” at human walking speeds, and sports a pair of cartoonish eyes cute enough to make you feel bad about having it bring you a burrito during a rainstorm. 

Tech | Products
Retail is on the Verge of a Tech-Assisted Renaissance
Tech | Artificial Intelligence
Taylor Swift Knows Your Face
Tech | Sustainability
Scientists Attempt to Cool Earth with Calcium Carbonate