Innovation
Tech | Science
Introducing Glass Made From Mussels

An invasive mussel species—Zebra Mussels—has caused environmental disturbances in the Great Lakes for decades. A group of resourceful design students decided to use the pesky creatures to make stunning blue glass.

Tech | Science

New Technology Could Generate Sweet Dreams

Scientists invented a wearable device that sends prompts to users to guide what they dream about for a sweeter shut eye experience. 

Tech | Engineering
Could Diamonds and Durian Fruit Hold the Key to Sustainable Batteries?
Tech | Science
Internet Goes Airborne
Tech | Transportation
Fly Away Without The Lines

Manufacturers Take Recycling Efforts into Own Hands with Innovative Programs

While wellness remains top of mind given the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, some flooring manufacturers also are combatting another health concern—the mounting consequences of our warming planet. Action to reduce carpet waste, four billion pounds of which end up in landfills each year, is imperative as product demand rises, especially on the heels of the Carpet & Rug Institute’s recent announcement to suspend a $4 million voluntary product stewardship program. 

Tech | Science
Llamas could be the Source of an Effective Covid-19 Treatment
Tech | Transportation
Take a Look at the Future of Commuting
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Tech | Science
Scientists Eye Squids For Clues to Human Genetics

Scientists discovered a way to enable human cells to go into an active camouflage state, morphing into transparent forms. How did they do it? They got the idea from a squid protein. This could be a new key to understanding genetics.

Tech | Science

Cacti Could Be The Perfect Biofuel

In Camémbaro, Mexico, the Nopal plant has a lot of potential as a biofuel source—it doesn’t need much water or additional land space, and it’s already used to power industrial buildings. In the near future, it could also power cars.

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Tech | Engineering
Space Company Plans to Sling Rockets into Orbit
Tech | Software
Group Selfies Survive Social Distancing
Tech | Urban Planning
Cashless Villages Are Popping Up In India
Tech | Manufacturing

Pass The Pasta, and The Clean Fuel

A pasta producer near Naples, Italy, is testing a mix of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel in an effort to reduce carbon emissions, making use of boilers that also provide heat to dry and sterilize noodles. 

Tech | Materials
A Second Life for Wind Turbines
Tech | Science
Can We Zap Away Coronavirus Pathogens?
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Tech | Transportation
Cargo Industry Goes Full Steam Ahead to Curb Carbon

Container ships transporting goods from one corner of the world to another emit large amounts of carbon and greenhouse gases as they glide through the sea, but now the industry is working to change that with cleaner fuel. 

Tech | Engineering

The Role of 3D Printing In the Coronavirus Crisis

Two Italian engineers—founders of a company that makes items such as earthquake sensors and silicone bandages—take their country's ventilator valve shortage into their own hands. 

Tech | Healthcare
Paging Doctor... Smartphone?
Tech | Engineering
Living in a Digital (Post-Coronavirus) World
Tech | Science
Step Aside, Sniffer Dogs
Tech | Sustainability

These Tech Innovations Help Reduce Carbon Impact

As architects and designers prioritize sustainable design initiatives, the demand is growing for tools to calculate and better understand ways to reduce carbon emissions. Take a look at these three innovations, which make sustainable design more accessible. 

Tech | Science
Introducing The "Anti-Solar Panel"
Tech | Materials
Cotton with The Strength of Steel
Tech | Robotics
Spider-Man Sans The Suit
Tech | Science
Bacteria That Builds Bricks Is Here

A team of researchers is using photosynthetic microbes to create a living concrete, which can reproduce while absorbing carbon dioxide. Did we mention it changes color, too? The new construction material morphs from shades of green into more muted tones as it dries. 

Tech | Science

Eyes In The Back Of Your Head

Want to change the channel with a simple glance toward the corner of the TV screen? The startup NextMind is pioneering a noninvasive neural interface, which sits at the back of the skull, that claims to help you do just that and more. 

Tech | Artificial Intelligence
Are You Real? The Advent of AI Beings
Tech | Engineering
It's Electric: Meet the World's Fastest Airplane
Tech | Engineering
May The Force Be With You
Tech | Software

A Look At Future Farms

When it comes to technology, farming developments aren't always top of mind. But the 5G cellular software is transforming agriculture in more ways than one.

Tech | Science
Could Your DNA Help You Date?
Tech | Sustainability
Meet The Search Engine Tackling Climate Change
Tech | Science
Chip Ahoy!
Tech | Science
Holograms Come of Age

Researchers from the University of Sussex have found a way to create holograms that you can not only see but also hear and even feel using ultrasound waves.

Tech | Products

A House Blanket Could be the Solution to Wildfires

When wrapped around a building, these "whole-house fire blankets" can protect a structure from the ravages of wildfires.

Tech | Robotics
Walk This Way
Tech | Engineering
It's a bird, it's a plane... no it's a Volocopter
Tech | Science
The Future of Food
Tech | Science

Can Flame-Retardant Gel Protect Forests From Wildfires?

Stanford materials scientist Eric Appel and his brother-in-law—Jesse Acosta, formerly a fire prevention forester for the state of Hawaii, now at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo—infused medical gels with fire retardants in an attempt to mitigate wildfires. The result? An environmentally safe gel that acts as a delivery medium for longer-lasting protection against flames, unlike current flame-retardant solutions, which quickly blow away. 

Tech | Engineering
A new Biotechnology Solution Could be the end of Plastic
Tech | Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Intelligence-Driven Apps Deliver Relationship Advice
Tech | Science
Inside the Controversial Plan to Cool the Planet