10 Highlights from ZONAMACO Diseño 2020

For the first time, Mexico City held the four fairs of ZONAMACO—Latin America’s leading art platform—under one roof. From February 5-9, ZONAMACO Diseño, ZONAMACO México Arte Contemporáneo, ZONAMACO Foto, and ZONAMACO Salón showcased design, art, photography, and antiques.

Among the 2020 edition’s highlights: a collective project for independent spaces curated by guadalajara90210 and directed by Alma Saladin and Marco Rountree, which acted as an informal bazaar with pieces available for purchase, and ZONAMACO Libros, which offered specialized art and photography books from more than 20 publishers, including Taschen and TIS books (both based in New York).

Offering a selection of furniture, objects, textiles, and jewelry, ZONAMACO Diseño—which is curated by Cecilia León de la Barra—celebrated its 10th anniversary this year. Art Lexïng, Odabashian, and Tile Blush from Miami, along with Balmaceda, Breuer, and Xinú from Mexico City were some of the exhibitors.

Here are our top 10 product highlights from the 2020 edition of ZONAMACO Diseño.

1. Noviembre Collection by Joel Escalona for Breuer

The Noviembre Collection by Joel Escalona for Breuer. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Created by Joel Escalona and debuting during ZONAMACO Diseño, the furniture collection Noviembre is the Mexican designer’s first collaboration with furniture company Breuer. Inspired by Constantin Brancusi, the seats, tables, and decorative pieces feature serene lines and explore form and function.

2. Javier Marín and Odabashian

Javier Marin and Odabashian. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Odabashian—one of the oldest luxury rug manufacturers in the Americas—presented a new collection of two rugs woven in a traditional Tibetan knot technique and five tapestries that are 100 percent handmade (all w.3ith New Zealand wool .) and created in collaboration with Mexican artist Javier Marín, who noted, “this collection is as much about process as it is the final outcomes.”

3. Origins by Lynne Golob Gelfman and Jonathan Gonzalez for Tile Blush

Origins by Lynne Golob Gelfman and Jonathan Gonzalez for Tile Blush. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

With Origins, Miami-based gallery Tile Blush showcases the evolution of Lynne Golob Gelfman’s thru paintings along with Jonathan Gonzalez’s new pieces of furniture and lighting in a project that explored forms, colors, and patterns.

4. Fragmentos by Melissa Aldrete, Luis Cárdenas, and Ursula Hernández for Casa Gutiérrez Nájera

Fragmentos by Melissa Aldrete, Luis Cárdenas, and Ursula Hernandez for Casa Gutiérrez Nájera. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Based in the city of Querétaro, Casa Gutiérrez Nájera focused on contemporary design pieces with the objective of preserving and paying tribute to Mexico’s cultural heritage and identity. Made of clay and copper, the collection Fragmentos was created by Mexican designers Melissa Aldrete, Luis Cárdenas, and Ursula Hernández.

5. Console by Ezequiel Farca + Cristina Grappin

Console by Ezequiel Farca + Cristina Grappin. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Design studio Ezequiel Farca + Cristina Grappin, which has offices in Los Angeles, Milan, and Mexico City, focused on creating holistic spaces. The team presented a console made of solid walnut with handles and legs in hammered copper and a marble top, among other pieces. The console was made by Mexican craftsmen from different regions.

6. Dioniso Wine Decanter by Sofía Mayagoitia and David Senado Zaga

Dioniso Wine Decanter by Sofía Mayagoitia and David Senado Zaga of Universidad Iberoamericana. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Design students from the Universidad Iberoamericana (IBERO) were among ZONAMACO Diseño’s youngest participants. Sofía Mayagoitia and David Senado Zaga created the sculptural wine decanter Dioniso, combining functionality and beauty. 

7. Time Capsules by José María Balmaceda

Time Capsules by José María Balmaceda. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Fascinated by time, textile artist José María Balmaceda based his new collection of rugs on this concept. Woven by artisans in Nepal, the pieces—which mix Asian and Mexican cultures—reflects questions such as “Where does time come from?” and “How can something so intangible be so powerful?”

8. Aiko Bench by Trra

Aiko Bench by Trra. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Available in different types of wood, this bench is part of the Aiko collection by Trra, a furniture company launched in 2007 by designer Fabiola Avalos and based in Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Every piece combines Nordic style and contemporary Mexican references.

9. Mayan Blue Stools by Carsten Lemme for Ángulo 0

Mayan Blue stools by Carsten Lemme for Ángulo O. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

Mixing industrial and artisanal techniques, the Mayan Blue collection created by Mexico City-based German designer Carsten Lemme for Ángulo 0 as inspired by the mythical and ritual history of blue pigment. Molded in volcanic stone by craftsman Enrique Hernández (from the Mexican city of Puebla), these stools are lacquered with a deep blue hue.

10. Origo by Studio davidpompa for Taracea

Origo by Studio davidpompa for Taracea. Photography courtesy of the galleries, designers, and ZONAMACO.

“The Origo collection speaks to us about light and darkness, tension of weights, and the aesthetic beauty of both,” says Mexican designer David Pompa. This pendant fixture is showcased by furniture company Taracea, which focuses on traditional artisanal methods to create modern and classical design pieces by hand.

Read more: 15 New Product Highlights From Maison&Objet 2020

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