Installation Highlights from 3DaysofDesign 2019

A funny thing happened shortly after Signe Terenziani founded annual Danish design event 3DaysofDesign in 2014: Everyone wanted to join in, Danish or not. As seen at this year’s event, which ran May 23-25 in Copenhagen, there was a clever workaround: Coinciding exhibitions and installations—many of them held at embassies. From a house that fits together like a puzzle at the Swiss embassy to swamp foliage filling the prim and stately interior of the Institut Français to a concept store virtually overcome with grass, here are 12 of our favorite installations seen at this year’s event.

Photography courtesy of HHF Architects.

Interlocking plastic components ingeniously formed the Puzzle House by Danish architect Bjarke Ingels of Bjarke Ingels Group and Swiss architect Simon Frommenwiler of HHF Architects, presented at Copenhagen’s waterfront Embassy of Switzerland; they can be broken down into seating elements and partitions offering wind protection. 

Photography courtesy of Gubi.

In sharp contrast to the stately ambience of the Institut Français, swamp grass surrounded newly reissued pieces by iconic French designers from Gubi. A chandelier hung over the C-Chair dining chair, nestled in pampas grass dried to a honey hue. It was designed by Marcel Gascoin in 1947 and is now available in walnut or oak.

Photography courtesy of Gubi.

The legless Pacha lounge chair—introduced by Pierre Paulin in 1975 as a low but elegant way of seating—was also presented at the Institut Français. A pampas grass installation was dyed to match the blue upholstery from French fabric house Pierre Frey.

Photography courtesy of 3DaysofDesign.

At the residence of the Finnish Ambassador to Denmark, Petite 4630 lamps from Finnish brand Secto Design sprouted from a bed of moss, as part of an exhibition featuring Finnish design and lifestyle brands.

Photography courtesy of LesnaVesna.

At the Embassy of Slovenia, the exhibit “Narava” celebrated young design talents from the central European country. The Miss Petticoat lamp collection from design studio LesnaVesna has playful dual-structured shades in walnut, birch, or plywood designed to resemble the retro fashion item. 

Photography by Alastair Philip Wiper, courtesy of Nomad Workspace.

At Nomad Workspace, a co-working space in the former Nørrebro Courthouse, 30 designers took over the ground floor as part of “DAWN x Nomad Workspace,” an exhibit curated by Natalia Sanchez. The Cherry on Top is a collection of mouth-blown glass objects by Helle Mardahl.

Photography by Maja Karen Hansen, courtesy of Nomad Workspace.

Carpets by Layered and Poppykalas were also featured in “DAWN x Nomad Workspace.” 

Photography courtesy of Louise Roe Gallery.

Verdant green grass grew throughout concept store Louise Roe Gallery, as part of the installation “A Walk in the Park.” 

Photography courtesy of Louise Roe Gallery.

“A Walk in the Park” also marked the launch of new materials for the Balloon 04 vase by Louise Roe—among them sky-blue-glazed ceramic.

Photography courtesy of Dinesen.

What does a tree smell like? For the instillation “The Scent of Dinesen,” wood plank manufacturer Dinesen dove deep on this topic, collaborating with Norwegian artist and scent researcher Sissel Tolaas to create an archive of recorded smell molecules. Despite attracting those keen to purchase, the resulting collection of scents—surprisingly diverse and complex—are not for sale.

Photography courtesy of Karimoku Case Study.

The Kinfolk Gallery served as backdrop for the launch of new lifestyle brand Karimoku Case Study, with products presented as a well-appointed apartment. The brainchild of Japanese wood furniture manufacturer Karimoku in collaboration with architecture and design studios Norm Architects and Keiji Ashizawa Design, Karimoku Case Study features products inspired by the temples, shrines, and gardens of Japan. The Case Study Kinuta N-CT01 low table by Norm Architects draws its form from Japanese facades and doors. 

Photography courtesy of Mia Lagerman.

Mia Lagerman, a designer who has lived much of her life straddling the two countries of Sweden and Denmark, was the focus of an exhibit at the Embassy of Sweden. Lagerman’s Sky Wood is a lightweight, stackable chair in molded FSC-certified oak.

Photography courtesy of Hay.

Hay took over two stories of the historic Lindencrone Palais villa to examine the future of live and work spaces. This vignette features the Bernard chair by Shane Schneck—launched last month—paired with the Fifty-Fifty floor lamp by Sam Weller and the Slit table.

Photography courtesy of Hay.

A dining/communal work space area at the Hay installation was furnished with the Result chair by Friso Kramer and Wim Rietveld, a melamine Fleck bowl, and a Pyramid table and bench in matte-lacquered oak.

Photography courtesy of Odd Fellows Mansion.

A giant version of the iconic Ball Chair by Finnish designer Eero Aarnio was clearly winning the prize for most popular photo op at Odd Fellows Mansion, the location of “Framing,” an exhibit presented by PR firm Samira Kudsk in collaboration with industry brands and experts.

Photography styled by Pernille Vest, courtesy of Ole Palsby Design.

At the Hotel Charlottenborg in the historic Charlottenborg Festsal building, 16 brands were featured in an exhibit curated by Ark Journal focusing on the hospitality market. The Frama|Ole Palsby collection by Ole Palsby Design in collaboration with Frama consists of cutlery produced in Japan with a matt surface achieved by high-pressure polishing.

Read more: 16 Danish Furniture Highlights from Copenhagen’s 3DaysofDesign

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