Numen/For Use Refashions "The Tube" Installation for Handbag Designer Anya Hindmarch in London

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

Art collective Numen/For Use took a previous installation for handbag designer Anya Hindmarch and made it new in London. The Tube debuted in Austria in 2015, originally in black. But for the London version, Hindmarch decided on a royal blue instead.

The installation was assembled by 14 designers and fabricators led by Numen/For Use artists Sven Jonke and Nikola Radeljkovic. It was comprised of 4,500 square feet of netting and one thousand suspension ropes, spanned 300 feet, and took four days to install. Over 2,000 visitors climbed through The Tube during its four-day run.

“When people walked through, it oscillated and pulsated,” Nikola Radeljkovic says.

Check out the process of installing The Tube below >

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

The art collective Numen/For Use began by manually hanging The Tube, which debuted in Austria in 2015, in Brewer Street Car Park, in advance of London Fashion Week’s fall/winter 2019 previews.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

Riggers stretched the woven-polyester netting into position with polyester sus­pension ropes and aerial work platforms.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

The immersive installation celebrated the launch of Anya Hindmarch’s Neeson line of woven leather totes.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

Called the “Weave Project,” the Brewer Street space also included product displays alongside embroiderers who could personalize Neeson bags with handwoven symbols or initials.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

The original color of The Tube netting was black, but Hindmarch specified royal blue.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

The installation’s highest point was 23 feet.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

Ropes were either tied with fisher­man’s knots to the ceiling’s steel arma­ture or to half-ton concrete blocks.

Photography courtesy of Numen/For Use and Anya Hindmarch.

Over 2,000 visitors climbed through The Tube during its four-day run.

Check out these other recent installations in Europe: Studio INI Creates Breathing Walls for London Design Biennale and 4 Public Art Installations Engage the Eye and the Mind.

> See more from the April 2019 issue of Interior Design

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