Where Ideas Blast Off: Situ Studio Reinvents New York Hall of Science

Structures below combine solid-surfacing with redwood salvaged from water towers. Photography by Eric Laignel.

For the Tree House, slats milled from salvaged logs of paper birch were stained, then bent. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Exhibited on the site during the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Mercury–Atlas D and Gemini–Titan 2 rocket ships remain on the museum grounds. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Ribs of furniture-grade Baltic birch plywood support the Tree House’s enclosure. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Rubber-cork composite flooring distinguishes the activity stations. Photography by John Muggenborg.

Handrails for the Tree House were made from off-the-shelf steel compo nents. Photography by Eric Laignel.

In the Sandbox, visitors assemble structures from ¼-inch dowels. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Rubber bands serve as connectors. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Panels of fireproofed Baltic birch plywood enclose the Studio. Photography by Eric Laignel.

A score-and-bend technique shaped the maple-veneered plywood of a reading nook, part of the Sandbox. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Outside stands a bronze sundial sculpture by Maty Grünberg. Photography by Eric Laignel.

A catwalk connects the lobby to the top of the Tree House. Photography by John Muggenborg.

Its interior is lined in benches and shelves. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Activity stations at the New York Hall of Science include the Studio, where liquid chalk on laser-cut cardboard identifies a project. Photography by Eric Laignel.

Completed creations often remain on display. Photography by John Muggenborg.

For Backstage, a steel truss supports panels of bent, perforated gal-vanized steel. Photography by John Muggenborg.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE. Photography by John Muggenborg.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE. Photography by John Muggenborg.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE. Photography by John Muggenborg.

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