OFFICE

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ImageNet Consulting: 2015 BoY Winner for Small Tech Office

Every one of his projects tells a story. And every story starts with words. “My word paintings are my shorthand way of communicating with clients,” Interior Design Hall of Fame member Rand Elliott says. In the case of his latest effort for ImageNet Consulting—which started as the Southwest Typewriter Company and eventually morphed to become an ecologically responsible provider of information technology and data storage—his key words were recycle and reflect.


This remodel in a Dallas suburb involved 9,500 square feet in a pre­cast concrete warehouse. “ImageNet staff can take customers on a tour to talk about information management,” he says. Along the way, they would be amazed by his creativity in reinventing detritus as decor.


Slicing off the bases of file cabinets, then wiring them for LEDs, created pendant fixtures. Foam panels, from packing crates, have become wall sculpture, as have toner cartridges, those pesky elements so difficult to dispose of. A reflective padded material, manufactured as insulation, covers other walls.


At the end of a corridor, he transformed an alcove into a celebratory moment, almost an altar: He placed a vintage typewriter on a pedestal, made with a stack of recycled paper, while behind rises a glass panel swathed in the aqueous blue shrink wrap that protects ImageNet equipment.


Project Team:


Michael Shuck; Charity Boone.


> See more from the December 2015 issue of Interior Design