HOSPITALITY

At New York’s Dining by Design to benefit DIFFA: Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS, the message was unmistakable. 1. Firm: Rockwell ...
Imagining a world of lightweight tents and simple huts, of mobile structures that can pack up or be towed away, ...
From a French library to the D.C. headquarters of the Nuclear Energy Institute to a tiny seaside bodega in Spain, ...
The soulful folk rock of the late Townes Van Zandt has been an inspiration to Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Norah ...
Imagine if your favorite bookstore also offered overnight accommodation. That was Suppose Design Office Co.’s premise for Book and Bed, ...
Lim Seungmo has never seen a bullfight nor danced the tango. But that didn’t stop him from mashing up the ...

Bluarch Adopts Professor Lackner’s Technology For CO2-Absorbing Tower

Tree-huggers worth their bark know that plants eat carbon dioxide. But what if a building could do the same thing? That’s the supposition explored by Klaus S. Lackner, director of Arizona State University’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions. Lackner developed the technology that serves as the basis for Bluarch’s theoretical Miami apartment tower, which would scrub carbon dioxide from the air.


Resin composing the exterior columns captures noxious emissions, which are compressed into liquid and stored deep underground, beneath the garage. Because the 42-story, 250,000-square-foot structure splits at the center, there is also more available surface area to be clad in thin-film photovoltaic cells, making each apartment energy self-sufficient.


Image courtesy of Bluarch.


> See more from the March 2016 issue of Interior Design