Advertisement
Continue to Site »

site_header_zone


Search by keywords

 
Trending
FIT Honors Provocative Design Firm LOT-EK
Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano. Photo by Danny Bright.   ...
Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Secures Icon Status With 25th Anniversary
Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams. This year, Mitchell Gold + ...
Salone del Mobile 2014
  Product highlights, news, interviews, video and more from our ...
10 Questions With… Bryan Shiles
  Despite being a fairly young architecture firm, nine-year-old WRNS ...
ASID Names 2014 Design Awards Winners
Tailored Hair Salon interiors by Amy Campos. Photography by ACA. ...
Question
Which clothing label would you want to create the runway set design for, and what would you do?
Answer

projects_detail_left_zone

The Small Screen Goes Big: Corus Entertainment Toronto Headquarters by Quadrangle Architects

  • PROJECT NAME Corus Entertainment Headquarters
  • LOCATION Toronto
  • FIRM Quadrangle Architects
  • SQ. FT. 500,000 SQF
Corus Entertainment is a major name in Canadian media. Once a modest TV and radio company, Corus became a major player in corporate acquisitions. It’s now grown to 50-plus brands, specializing in women’s and children’s programming.

Executives in Toronto saw more than back-office benefits in con­solidating most TV, radio, Web, and print holdings under one roof—but worried that the effort to create synergy risked sapping them of personality and autonomy instead. What would happen when Rosie  O’Donnell from the Oprah Winfrey Network bumps into Sponge Bob Square Pants from Nickelodeon at the water cooler? “After years in their own silos, not everyone was keen on coming together,” Quadrangle Architects prin­cipal Brian Curtner says.

His hip solution for the eight-story building’s 500,000-square-foot interior, designed for 1,100 employees, mixes equal parts established branding and zany inventiveness. The interventions start with the lobby’s huge corkscrew slide. They continue on office levels with glassed-in meeting rooms outfitted with kicky furnishings and identified by the appropriate logos. Every so often, he applied a stroke of color: muted orange here, egg-yolk yellow there, royal purple just for fun.

Lively accents contrast with the subtlety of the overall archi­tecture. In that regard, Curtner got an ample assist from the building, commissioned by the design-savvy City of Toronto from the masterful Diamond Schmitt Architects. The H-shape floor plates, defined by the care­fully detailed atrium, maximize views of Sugar Beach Park, a sandy new amenity on Lake Ontario.