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Water Makes a Splash in Interiors and Architecture

Water Discus Hotel

 

The presence of water is, well, vital—vital to our bodies, our lives, and our entire well-being. Its absence? Honestly, we don’t want to think about that. Which is perhaps why we as humans love to see, hear, smell, and feel water essentially everywhere we go. Accordingly, it’s no surprise that water features continue to appear indoors as much as out these days, from design elements as minimal as tabletop waterfalls and accessories to mindblowing architecture that derives its very essence from an underwater experience, such as at the awesome Huvafen Fushi resort and spa in the Maldives.

“Water is the equilibrium and elixir of life—restorative, calming, balancing and renewing vitality,” says a spokesperson for Per AQUUM, who developed the still unique spa and resort as a pioneer in underwater hospitality back in 2004. “The spa’s underwater treatment rooms create a rejuvenating encounter with water in a way that no other spa in the world has done.” Using 5-inch-thick, clear, solid-cast resin, it took nearly 12 months to create the underwater structure, accessed by enclosed walkway along a jetty attached to the main, gound-level spa.

And aquatic features on a smaller level (but we're not talking fish tanks) are being constructed in medical centers, office buildings, hotels, and private residences across the globe. It’s not just to soothe the stressed. “More so lately than ever before, we have seen our clients become more aware and concerned with design functionality,” says Rob Morton, director of sales and marketing at Bluworld of Water. “Our clients aren’t just wanting a beautiful cascading wall of water, but a piece that conveys the overall design aesthetic of the space that it’s in.” Keep reading for four firms and projects that currently push the envelope in what we can expect—and enjoy—from water in interiors.

Aquadream in Casablanca


 
Bluworld of Water