Advertisement
Continue to Site »

site_header_zone


Search by keywords

 
Trending
FIT Honors Provocative Design Firm LOT-EK
Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano. Photo by Danny Bright.   ...
Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Secures Icon Status With 25th Anniversary
Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams. This year, Mitchell Gold + ...
Salone del Mobile 2014
  Product highlights, news, interviews, video and more from our ...
10 Questions With… Bryan Shiles
  Despite being a fairly young architecture firm, nine-year-old WRNS ...
ASID Names 2014 Design Awards Winners
Tailored Hair Salon interiors by Amy Campos. Photography by ACA. ...
Question
Which clothing label would you want to create the runway set design for, and what would you do?
Answer

projects_detail_left_zone

Mood Indigo: Federico Delrosso Designs a Tiny Trattoria in Chelsea

  • PROJECT NAME CafeB
  • LOCATION New York
  • FIRM Federico Delrosso Architects
  • SQ. FT. 2,400 SQF

Bice Ristorante opened in 1926 in Milan, and satellite locations now dish up trattoria classics around the world. When a restaurant space became available at the Hotel Indigo in Chelsea, the Bice team swooped in with a spin-off, the Italian-inflected CafeB. And Federico Delrosso Architects, which had already designed Bice outposts in Istanbul and San Diego, agreed to take on the vest-pocket dining room, at 1,400 square feet.


To define a path from the street, through the hotel lobby, Federico Delrosso laid a swath of the same woven vinyl "tatami" matting that softens the existing floor in the restaurant. A photomural along the way reproduces a Milanese street scene in black-and-white. Another photomural, showing library bookshelves, wraps a corner outfitted with a painted wooden table and what he calls "traditional trattoria lighting." Suspended above the host station, white plastic tubes descend en masse to create an ornamental canopy.


On the hotel roof, Delrosso re­designed an L-shape terrace, 2,000 square feet, as the SkyB lounge. To hide the elevator tower and parapet's "ugly bricks," he says, he sheathed them in pine planks intentionally dinged before a weather-resistant brown finish was applied. There are beanbag chaise longues for slouching. But most of the chairs and tables are simple forms in folded powder-coated aluminum, based on prototypes he developed for a 2009 ex­hibition in Milan. Everything is surrounded by windbreaks of fritted glass, the bottom of each panel artfully fogged for a feeling he describes as "floating on a cloud." Or in a sea of iconic wooden water towers.


PROJECT TEAM