Argonaut by Huntsman Architectural Group: 2016 Best of Year Winner for Midsize Media/Tech Office

Janis Joplin sang here. So did the Grateful Dead and the Doors. And that was just one chapter in the long history of the Avalon Ballroom. It was built in 1911 as a dance academy before becoming a music venue. ...

PROJECTS

These high-design museums invite visitors to get lost within their walls. For more inspiration, check out our Institutions board on Pinterest....
Behind the ride-sharing app’s very first self-driving cars is a team working out of an advanced technologies center. And behind that office, ...
Emily Dickinson wrote, “Hope is the thing with feathers.” For the Mile High city, hope is a thing with wings. This avian complex in con...
Whether you're winding down after work or socializing with friends, these bars provide an awe-inspiring backdrop. For more inspiration, check ...
Like a bar at happy hour, packed shoulder-to-shoulder with suits, this part of the city skyline is crowded with what Kengo Kuma calls the “ha...
Lewis Carroll’s magical Through the Looking-Glass isn’t the only book to reveal a shadow realm of imagination and inspired possibi...

FM.X Interior Design Co.: 2016 Best of Year Winner for Kitchen/Bath

Busy working on a pharmaceutical office in a southern port city across the sea from Taiwan, design director Xu Fu-Min received a phone call about a very different kind of project nearby. The client asked Xu to visit the site of his future family home—a weedy hillside that, on first glance, seemed less than enticing. But what intrigued Xu was an enormous boulder, 10 feet across, sitting smack in the middle of the 1-acre property. “I insisted we keep it,” he says. Around it, he proceeded to design a 4,200-square-foot house.


Returning Hut by FM.X Interior Design Co. Photography by Wu Yong Chang.

Returning Hut by FM.X Interior Design Co. Photography by Wu Yong Chang.


Humble and pure were the project’s guiding words. Respect for nature was also paramount, starting with the courtyard’s reclaimed flagstones, which wend their way around the existing trees. “People live in rural areas as children, then move to the city in pursuit of a luxurious life—only to discover that the usual luxury becomes superficial,” Xu continues. A live-edge slab of ash wood tops the dining table, paired with Hans Wegner chairs. Sybaritic yet worlds away from city-slick is the master bathroom. Inside a frameless glass box, a sunken tub of poured-in-place concrete contains the very boulder he had so admired on that first visit. Worn by the weather, over time, the stone surface is as smooth as skin. 


Returning Hut by FM.X Interior Design Co. Photography by Wu Yong Chang.

Returning Hut by FM.X Interior Design Co. Photography by Wu Yong Chang.


> See more from the December 2016 issue of Interior Design

MOST SHARED

“An invitation to think differently about how we inhabit our future cities.” That’s how Bjarke Ingels describes his “court-scraper,” a whizzed-up blend of the 19th-century courtyard typology and a contemporary ...

ShopWithMe by Giorgio Borruso Design: 2016 Best of Year Winner for Pop-Up

Some things truly deserve the often used adjective disruptive. This pop-up is one of them. With it, Giorgio Borruso and the technology company WithMe are turning retail inside out and upside down, presenting a new paradigm in terms of technology ...