Innovation
Culture | Art
FreelandBuck Creates Visual Puzzles by Cloning Historical Ceilings

The Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery presented its first large-scale architectural commission, an immersive site-specific ceiling installation by architectural firm FreelandBuck. Parallax Gap is a visualization of American ceiling design from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, exploring the concept of parallax, or how the position of an object appears to shift from one viewpoint to the next. Utilizing Rhinoceros and Grasshopper programs, FreelandBuck recreated structures from nine buildings including Cincinnati’s Union Terminal and Philadelphia’s City Hall on stacked polypropylene panels.

Culture | Art

Designer Spends 10 Years Building Paper Model of a Boeing 777

For the past 10 years, Luca Iaconi-Stewart has been building a model of a Boeing 777 out of manila folders and glue. What began as a school project has transformed into a remarkable feat of research, technical know-how, and persistence. Measuring at 1/60th the size of a true 777, the model contains more than 300 non-reclining seats, retractable landing gear, and moveable wing flaps. 

Culture | Art
Google Street View Helps an Agoraphobic Woman Travel the World
Culture | Food
How Architects Infuse Pastries with Precision
Culture | Fashion
The Arrivals Designs Clothes That Pay Tribute to Architecture

How Design Inspires Creativity in the Workplace

We’re all born with varying degrees of creativity. Companies that want to be competitive and innovative in today’s market are turning to workplace design as a solution to boost creativity. Rapidly, the design community has responded by envisioning projects and products that honor the creative urge in all of us and seek to hone that drive into an even sharper expression of what the contemporary digital workforce is able to accomplish. 

Culture | Art
L.A. Selfie Museum Amuses and Educates on the New Millennium’s Favorite Pastime
Culture | Transportation
Pantone My Ride
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Culture | Art
L.A. Selfie Museum Amuses and Educates on the New Millennium’s Favorite Pastime

On April 1, the world’s first selfie museum opened its doors in the L.A. suburb of Glendale. Intended to be a half-way silly, half-way serious examination of the selfie, the museum traces the history of self-portraiture from the Big Bang up to 2018. Visitors are welcome to take photos with life-sized statues of food, sit on an “Iron Throne” of selfie sticks, and get duped by the museum’s bathroom mirror room – where a viewer would expect to see their reflection in the “mirror” they’re instead shocked to only see a photographic replica of the room’s interior within the mirror. These playful but meaningful exhibits seek to undermine the stigma of narcissism associated with selfie culture and instead promote a more nuanced, exploratory attitude towards humanity’s long obsession with making the ephemeral concept of “Self” tangible.

What Will the Jobs of the Future Be?

As humanity plunges further into the 21st century, the question of what kind of new occupations people will be able to pursue sometimes gets lost in all the wild speculation about future products. A group of artists from AKQA and Misk Global Forum decided to try their hand at imaging the employment possibilities in the year 2030, based on several panels at the World Economic Forum. 

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Culture | Fashion
MIT Creates Tiny Robot Jewelry
Culture | Music
A Water Tank Becomes an Unlikely Performance Venue
Culture | Fashion
IKEA's Beloved Tote Gets a Street Style Boost From Virgil Abloh
Culture | Art

Coachella’s Virtual Reality Dome Delivered an Acid-Free Trip

Want to trip without the hallucinogens? Consider Chrysalis from last year’s Coachella, the art and music festival held in California’s Coachella Valley. Engineered by San Francisco firm Obscura Digital, the 120-foot psychedelic VR dome featured 108 speakers, 15 projectors, and 500 seats to create an immersive experience centered on the birth of a butterfly. The immersive aspects of Chrysalis required an unprecedented two teams, an entirely automated self-adjustment system, and fifteen cameras instead of the usual two. 

Culture | Art
Ever Been in a Semi-Anechoic Chamber?
Culture | Art
Atacama Desert Inspires Outdoor Performance Venue by Coz y Ortiz Arquitectos
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Culture | Art
Ugo Rondinone Brightens Fundación Casa Wabi With Local Children’s Sketches of the Sun

The Mexican sculptor Bosco Sodi made a splash in New York last spring with his temporary brick-wall installation, an interactive public-art piece. But back home, he's been fostering art and community since 2014, when he founded Fundación Casa Wabi, a nonprofit entity that occupies a Tadao Ando Architect & Associates building in Puerto Escondido and mounts exhibitions meant to provide enrichment for locals.

Culture | Manufacturing

Levi’s Aims to Detoxify Jean Manufacturing

Levi’s is introducing a digitizing technique to its manufacturing process called Project FLX (Future-Led Execution) that will eliminate harmful chemicals and reduce the production time of its jeans. The first step in Project FLX is to photograph the denim. Then the data is interpreted via a computer, which will use lasers to etch a distressed pattern onto a pair of jeans. With the initiative, Levi’s aims for zero discharge of hazardous materials and to reduce the amount of chemicals by the year 2020. 

Culture | Virtual Reality
Can VR Save the Movie Theater?
Culture | Augmented Reality
Jeff Koons and Snapchat Create First Location-Based AR Lens
Culture | Art
Murano Glass Factory (Briefly) Resurrected
Culture | Art

Kelly Harris Smith’s WantedDesign Installation Recasts Felt as Space-Maker

As co-founder of FilzFelt, Kelly Harris Smith is well schooled in the eco-friendly properties of the material. Now an independent designer and creative director, the textile trendsetter managed to wring even more possibility out of the cloth when she was invited to create a site-specific installation during WantedDesign 2017 in New York.

Culture | Science
Need Blacker Than Black Paint? You Got It
Culture | Art
Neon Glows Again at Trendy Restaurants
Culture | Architecture
Architecture and Fashion Go Hand in Hand
Culture | Food
Nonprofit Transforms Abandoned Spaces Into Soup Kitchens

In order to combat hunger and waste, Michelin-star chef Massimo Bottura and restaurateur Lara Gilmore created Food for Soul, a nonprofit aiming to both feed and engage communities. The organization strikes up agreements with local food suppliers to buy cast-off foods, taking food waste and turning it into a viable source of nourishment for underserved communities. Taking the monastic group meal tradition of refettorio as design inspiration, Food for Soul re-outfits unused or abandoned sites into industrial-level soup kitchens that can offer meals, lessons, and communal gathering space.

Culture | Art

Star-Studded Design Team Reimagines Claude Debussy’s Only Opera, Pelléas et Mélisande

A new incarnation of Pelléas et Mélisande, the only opera ever completed by Claude Debussy, in 1902, is a feast for the eyes—literally. Current-day directors and choreographers Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui and Damien Jalet envisioned the Opera Vlaanderen and Royal Ballet Flanders production as a window into the human soul. “The libretto is so much about vision that we thought to make the story unfold inside an eyeball,” Jalet explains.

Culture | Materials
Poured Concrete Flooring Eliminates Disease in Bangladeshi Homes
Culture | Art
The Museum of Ice Cream’s Latest Edition Lands in Miami Beach
Culture | Manufacturing
Reality of Tech-Led Apparel Manufacturing Grows Sharper
Culture | Fashion

Rei Kawakubo's Clothes Are Not Just Clothes

Rei Kawakubo, of Comme des Garçons fame, has showcased her abrasive, idiosyncratic creations since the late 1960’s. Since her aptly titled “Not Making Clothing” collection for Spring 2014, Kawakubo abandoned conventionally wearable clothing (for the runway, that is). Her latest seasons have taken a turn into the truly surreal, more towards sculpture than clothing. Lacking many of the visual cues and elements of clothing, Kawakubo’s work invites personal interpretation and individual expression.