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    Johanna Grawunder, Suzanne Tick Among Women Designers at Design Miami

    We couldn't help but notice the avant female designers well represented at Design Miami, ranging from iconic creators like Charlotte Perriand and Maria Pergay to up-and-comers like Johanna Grawunder, who debuted LED lighting. Meanwhile, handwoven tapestries from designers Suzanne Tick and the grand dame of textile art Sheila Hicks were also on view.


    Parisian furniture doyenne Maria Pergay, now age 82, began her career designing silver and iron pieces for Hermes and Christian Dior before opening her own boutique. Notable work from the 1970’s including the stainless steel Bureau S/Wave Desk was exhibited beside her 2005 Caviar cabinet and this year's cast-bronze tree with copper leaves at Demisch Danant.


    Sheila Hicks, now age 79, relocated to France in 1964 and has remained in Europe ever since. Her two- and three-dimensional woven work including public commissions and collaborations with architects have become highly collectible. At Design Miami, Hicks' large scale tapestries were strikingly paired with those of Pergay. Shown were 1988's PCP, plaited silk threads on canvas and 1977's Cord Structure in coil-wrapped yarn on muslin.


    Suzanne Tick is best known for commercial fabrics for contract companies including Knoll, Teknion and Tandus but her one-of-a-kind weavings are garnering attention as well. Pulp Fiction, a series woven from shredded divorce documents was on view at Cristina Grajales Gallery.


    Architect and lighting designer Johanna Grawunder divides her time between San Francisco and Milan where she worked for the Italian architect Ettore Sottsass for 17 years. Grawunder’s Pink Void was inspired by theatrical lighting and exhibited at The Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Made of anodized aluminum, the LED light is embedded with an acrylic diffuser and colored gel. Fabricated by the Neal Frey Company in California it was her first piece manufactured in the USA. 

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