Trending
Big Ideas: Michiel van der Kley's Project Egg Debuted at Dutch Design Week
Technology brings us together, but it can sometimes be isolating. ...
Big Ideas: Michael Roopenian Design Launches Wooden Keyboards
Photography courtesy of Michael Roopenian Design.   With all due ...
Big Ideas: If Willy Wonka Were an Architect
When the Maison & Objet trade fair in Paris declared ...
Pretty Brilliant: 6 Materials Look Good While Working Wonders
1. Material: T-Glase.Composition: PET plastic.Manufacturer: Taulman 3D.Recycled polymers, extruded in ...
Big Ideas: Dornbracht’s Performance-Art Side Comes Out In the New Museum Lobby
Photography by Dornbracht.Talk about making a splash. Dornbracht’s performance-art side comes out ...

JOB ZONE

jobseekers:

employers:

 
Weekly Poll
Which flooring trend are you dying to specify?

    industry_article_detail_left_zone

    1900 - 1930: From Electricity to Fluorescents

    Perhaps nothing better illustrates the world's evolving relationship with electric light during the past century than the naming behind one of the industry's oldest manufacturers. When he founded the New York Gas and Appliance Co. in 1904, Bernhard Blitzer hedged his bets, selling both gas and electrical fixtures.

     

    This lasted for more than a decade, until electric lighting became a more stable market. By 1918, Blitzer had changed the company's name to Lightolier, a combination of the words "light" and "chandelier." Electric lighting was here to stay, and what's more, it had quickly become an industry that encompassed art as well as function.

     

    Lighting design - not only the industrial design of lamps, but also the consideration of large illuminated environments - has by necessity evolved alongside architecture. As buildings grew taller and people began to work in urban centers, bigger spaces had to be illuminated. Along with more lights came greater concern for efficiency. In 1927, Edmund Germer patented the world's first fluorescent lamp, which allowed for more economical lighting with less heat.

     

    Fast Facts


    Tungsten Filaments
    In 1915, American Irving Langmuir invented an electric gas-filled bulb that used tungsten instead of carbon as filament inside the light bulb, making it less fragile and more efficient.

     

    Fluorescent Lamps
    In 1927, Edmund Germer, Friedrich Meyer, and Hans Spanner patented the fluorescent lamp, with a bulb coated on the inside to increase efficiency.

     

     

    <<

    >>1930 - 1958: The Dawn of "Architectural" Office Lighting

     

     

     

     

    industry_article_detail_central_zone