Trending
Google Taps Heatherwick Studio and BIG for Next HQ
  Google has named Heatherwick Studio and Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) ...
Design at Launch to Debut at New York Design Week
Smaller Objects is a new line by Claesson Koivisto Rune, ...
New York’s Woolworth Building Reopens to the Public
The crossing of the lobby, showing a vaulted ceiling with ...
Kohler Expands Popular Artifacts Collection To The Kitchen
The best home decor isn’t just beautiful, it’s timeless. Beauty ...
10 Questions With... Matthew Hufft
Craft-forward architect Matthew Hufft has earned international attention for an ...

JOB ZONE

jobseekers:

employers:

 
Weekly Poll
Which flooring trend are you dying to specify?

    Calendar Upcoming Events
    Mar 08
    Coronado, CA, United States

    BITAC Luxury North America 2015

    Mar 09
    Palm Springs, CA, United States

    Interior Design's Giants of Design 2015

    Mar 10
    Frankfurt, Germany

    ISH - Messe Frankfurt

    Mar 10
    Singapore, Singapore

    Maison & Objet Asia

    Mar 12
    San Francisco, CA, United States

    One Night Only San Francisco 2015


    Close Search by date

    or See All Upcoming Events

    industry_article_detail_left_zone

    A World Within: Ryumei Fujiki Investigates Architecture of the Future

    A World WithinFor a society to make it in the future, what kind of architecture is necessary? Ryumei Fujiki looks to nature to answer that question-in his dual roles as professor at Tokyo's Kogakuin University and principal of F.A.D.S. (Fujiki Architectural Design Studio). His installation Artificial Topography, which took the grand prize in the Kobe Biennale's Art in a Container International Competition, explored this interest, too. 


    Rethinking an earlier experiment into irregular formations on the surface of a body of water, he figuratively transferred the idea to dry land as negative space defined by soft plastic foam: 1,000 sheets glued and carved to form 11 comfortable nooks for sitting or lying down. They were spaced out across the container's 40-foot length to create, yes, an artificial topography. He allows that the imaginary landscape could be interpreted many ways, however. "For the earth, it could be a cave," he says. For anyone still interested in the water version, he suggests the amorphous shape of a jellyfish.

    industry_article_detail_central_zone