7 Seats Using Minimal Natural Materials
Minimal natural materials pack a punch.   1. River and ...
10 Questions With... Alex Michaelis
  From its humble beginnings in a converted loft, Alex ...
24 K&B Products Look to the Future
Straight or curved? Nella Vetrina asks that question with two ...
3 Trends in Biomimicry
Just imagine a future where self-healing concrete not only saves ...
Big-Game, Daniel Rybakken Win Debut Hublot Prize for Designers Under 40
Colour lamp by Daniel Rybakken, available through Ligne Roset.   ...




Weekly Poll
Designers: do you use Periscope and/or Meerkat?

    Calendar Upcoming Events
    Dec 01
    Miami , FL, United States

    Design Miami

    Dec 01
    Miami Beach, FL

    PULSE Miami Beach: Contemporary Art Fair

    Dec 02
    Toronto, Canada

    IIDA Leaders Breakfast Toronto 2015

    Dec 02
    New York, NY, United States

    Interior Design Hall of Fame Awards Gala

    Dec 03
    Miami Beach, FL

    NADA (New Art Dealers Alliance) Miami Beach

    Close Search by date

    or See All Upcoming Events


    Hi-Tech Tile Points to Spain's Bright Future

    Five cylindrical buildings clad in colorful ceramic tile comprise the Children's Education and Innovation Center, located in the heart of the Technology Park of Paterna in Valencia, Spain. The park contains over 450 companies that all together employ nearly 8,000 people. As these numbers continue to rise, so does the need for easily accessible day care.

    The Foundation for Innovation in Childhood of Valencian Community, an organization formed by companies headquartered in the park, commissioned Foursquare Arquitectos to design a children's center promoting creativity, educational innovation and socialization. Last but not least they tasked the architects with integrating sustainable technology. Lead architect Ana Garcia Sala teamed with M2 Distribución and Natucer of Tile of Spain to bring the $5.5-million project to fruition.

    The curved edges on the buildings' exteriors and interiors were inspired by observing children at play. “The rounded shapes lack sharp edges, promoting a comfortable, social environment for the children," says Sala. "This allows even the youngest to lean along the walls without fear.”

    Tile manufacturer Natucer used new technology in glazing to achieve the curved facades. The tiles went through a single-fire baking process at 1195ºC (2183°F) in order to obtain the necessary width of 5.3 inches and bowing radius of 33.5 inches. They were then stapled to a metal substructure of slotted tracks covering panels of aluminum and mineral wool.

    While the school of colorful buildings makes a strong visual statement about forward-thinking education, the center's carbon footprint is minimal thanks to geothermal energy, exterior solar panels, and resin-treated floors that help to regulate temperature.