Trending
Tony Award-Nominee David Rockwell Takes Cindy Allen "Backstage"
Interior Design Hall of Fame member David Rockwell has earned ...
Quiet Lifestyle Brand Muji Starts U.S. Expansion
You may not know that the word “Muji” is actually ...
Behind the Scenes with Gensler at Salone del Mobile
Gensler designers in Milan. Photo courtesy of Gensler. How do ...
Carpet Makers Work Together for Nepal Earthquake Relief
Woman preparing yarn in one of GoodWeave’s Nepal factories. Photo ...
NYC Design Week in 20 Photos
  Last week, the race was on and the global ...

JOB ZONE

jobseekers:

employers:

 
Weekly Poll
Which flooring trend are you dying to specify?

    Calendar Upcoming Events
    May 31
    New York, NY, United States

    NYU International Hospitality Industry Investment Conference

    Jun 03
    New York, NY

    BLLA Boutique Hotel Investment Conference

    Jun 08
    Carlsbad, CA, United States

    HOTEC Design

    Jun 13
    Chicago, IL

    The DIFFA/Chicago Believe 2015 Gala - Imagine Ball

    Jun 14
    Chicago, IL, United States

    Interior Design Giants Celebration at NeoCon


    Close Search by date

    or See All Upcoming Events

    industry_article_detail_left_zone

    Nathan Sawaya and Dean West Elevate Lego to Art

    Artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West unveil their first collaboration at the Openhouse Gallery in New York this week, the fruit of a three-year collaboration merging Sawaya’s sensational Lego sculpture with West’s hyper-realistic imagery. On view from February 28 to March 17 and presented by Avant Gallery, the exhibition is titled "In Pieces" and consists of seven large-scale images with a total of 11 sculptures incorporated into the compositions.

    The artists set up scenes in abandoned hotels in the Southwest and snowy landscapes in Toronto, layering Sawaya’s Legos into the photographs during post-production. The work appears sharply realistic, and the pixilated look of the Lego adds an unexpected—and sometimes tough to spot—surprise. Smaller items in the photos took Sawaya a day to build, but more dramatic pieces such as the red dress in Dress took six weeks.

    It all started in 2010, when Australian photographer West ordered a large set of Legos as an experiment and, seeking inspiration, began to scan images on the Web where he discovered Sawaya’s existing work in Lego. Skeletal structures and flowing forms made from the toy bricks captivated West, and he met Sawaya in New York just a few weeks later, hashing out a partnership that would drag them across the United States and Canada in a beat-up Jeep.

    “I’m just having fun and creating," says Sawaya. "When I first told my boss that I was quitting my job [as a corporate attorney], I said, ‘I’m going to leave to play with toys.’” But Sawaya and West have elevated the medium past child’s play into the realm of striking, thought-provoking contemporary art.

    industry_article_detail_central_zone