Cor-Ten Staircase Rises From Belgian Farmland

To construct Vlooyberg Tower in Tielt-Winge, Belgium, the architecture, industrial design, and engineering firm Close to Bone's CEO, Yves Willems, started by using a telescopic crane to lift the first of six galvanized-steel elements.
 

 Photography courtesy of Close to Bone.


 


Vlooyberg Tower by Close to Bone

 

- 2 designers and engineers
- 43 hours of installation
- 15 tons
- 37 feet high
- Sixty steps
 


 

Photography courtesy of Close to Bone.


That piece was set on a concrete foundation that incorporates two concrete pilings and six tension-ground anchors to keep the viewing tower in equilibrium.
 

 Photography courtesy of Close to Bone.


After the other elements were attached with high-strength bolts, the crane positioned the final piece.
 

Photography courtesy of Close to Bone.


The staircase's sides were clad in Cor-Ten steel, the same material as the steps.
 

Photography courtesy of Kris Van den Bosch.


Vlooyberg Tower, which replaces a wooden predecessor destroyed by vandals, rises from farmland.
 

Photography courtesy of Kris Van den Bosch.


A plaque lists donors.
 

Photography courtesy of Kris Van den Bosch.


The observatory is visible from a main road through the province of Flemish Brabant.
 

Photography courtesy of Close to Bone.


An appearance on Flemish TV has increased visitor traffic.


> See more from the January 2017 issue of Interior Design

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